Pictured here: nothing to watch.

Pictured here: nothing to watch.

I have decided to start a new monthly segment called “What’s On Netflix.” Not the most clever name, but at least it’s to the point.

Have you ever found your looking at the Netflix browse screen complaining that there’s nothing to watch? If so, guess what? You’re a fucking asshole.

There are literally thousands of hours of media on Netflix to enjoy, all available at the push of a button, and you have the cojones to piss and moan about there being nothing to watch?

Well, I got news for you, you spoiled little brats, you’re not going to be able to complain much longer.

Because, really, what you mean when you say “there’s nothing to watch” is “I don’t feel like stepping out of my comfort zone.” And fine, whatever, you don’t want to gamble with two hours of your life.

So, I’m doing the gambling for you. In this monthly segment, I will watch a relatively obscure movie on Netflix (recommended by YOU) and then review it, thus saving you from the bad movies and pushing you toward the good ones.

This month, I watched the movie Pi, recommended to me by my roommate, Dan.

Pretty much what the movie is like.

This poster really captures the experience.

Pi is the breakout film of Darren Aronofsky. You might remember the name because he also directed Requiem for a Dream, Black Swan, and the newly released Noah.

Pi was his first film to hit theaters and you can definitely see the flight path of his work.

Pi is shot in high contrast grainy black and white, making everything seem all the more surreal, as though it were a fuzzy memory or a bad dream.

The film follows Max Cohen, a brilliant young man with a mind for numbers. However, Max’s passion borders on obsession as he works to find a pattern in the apparent chaos of the stock market, which is somehow connected to a mysterious 216 digit number.

As the movie goes on, Max becomes more unhinged, experiencing nightmarish hallucinations and bouts of paranoid psychosis. While he struggles to keep his head, he is also pursued by people who are interested in using the 216 digit number for their own ends.

Now, I’m not gonna give everything away, but I will say that Pi’s ending is way less depressing than some of Aronofsky’s other films, so there’s that.

I definitely enjoyed this film. Even if some scenes were slow, the pure aesthetic of what was on the screen was enough to keep me entertained.

Pi

Directed by Darren Aronofsky
Produced by Darren Aronofsky, Eric Watson, Scott Vogel
Screenplay by Darren Aronofsky
Story by Darren Aronofsky, Sean Gullette, Eric Watson
Starring Sean Gullette, Mark Margolis, Ben Shenkman, Samia Shoaib
Music by Clint Mansell
Cinematography Matthew Libatique
Editing by Oren Sarch
Studio Protozoa Pictures
Distributed by Artisan Entertainment
Release dates July 10, 1998
Running time 83 minutes

Check this one out.

Be sure to send recommendations for next month to my email